The Fantastic Hoi An Temples of Central Vietnam

Hoi An, Vietnam

A day spent visiting the Hoi An Temples are a day well spent in Central Vietnam

Buddhist influences are felt far and wide throughout Southeast Asia, but perhaps the most beautiful and unique are the Hoi An Temples. Thanks to a combination of Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese and even French architecture notes, the temples are a stunning part of Central Vietnam’s ancient capital.

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Hainan Assembly Hall

Hoi An, Vietnam
Fancy fresh durian or bananas? A lady seller in a rice hat poses in front of the Hainan Assembly Hall

SInce I’ve already written at length about Hoi An this post will stick primarily to the brilliant Hoi An Temples and their overall vibes, architecture and general design.  First up in the Ancient Town of Hoi An is the Hainan Assembly Hall. It was built in 1851 by the Chinese of Hainan to serve both the Hainan and Jialing communities. The story behind this temple is that it is in memorium of 108 Chinese merchants who were mistakenly killed when locals believed them to be pirates. These merchants were named deities by King Tu Duc, who donated the money in order to build it.

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Chua Phap Bao Pagoda

Hoi An, Vietnam

The Chua Phap Bao Pagoda is the only temple in this mini Hoi An – Vietnam Travel Guide – that is located outside of the Ancient Town. The well-kept modern pagoda (relatively speaking, that is) is named after its founder and the 34th Chaplain Lam Te Chanh. Three famous Buddha Images are located in the compound – Shakyamuni Buddha, Amitabha Buddha and Maitreya Bodhisattva – and it was completely renovated in the year 2000 by Thich Hanh Niem. It was originally built in 1981.

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Cantonese Assembly Hall/Quang Trieu Assembly Hall/Hoi Quan Quang Dong

Hoi An, Vietnam

Built in 1885 by Guangdong/Cantonese Chinese immigrants, the Cantonese Assembly Hall is one of Hoi An’s most famous temples. Filled with statues made of pottery and mythical characters from Chinese and Vietnamese lore, the Assembly Hall has so much to see. Some of the temple compound was actually built in China and transported to Hoi An. For a bit of history, the Hall used to be located on a wharf and it was a meeting point for local fishermen and merchants to buy/sell/exchange goods. Festivals are held at the Hall several times a year so make sure to plan your trip around the festivities if possible!

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Trung Hoa Assembly Hall/Trung Tam Hoa Van Le Nghia

Hoi An, Vietnam

Hoi An’s oldest assembly hall, built in 1741, is the Duong Thuong Assembly Hall. Built with money from local traders of the five Chinese counties of Fukien, Zhao Zhou, Canton, Hainan and Jiain. Filled with history, it has been dedicated to a number of different people along with soldiers killed in the “anti-Japanese Resistance War.” It was renamed the Trung Hoa Assembly Hall in 1928, served as a public school for the Chinese and then named the Le-Nghia School. Today is serves as a school for children of the diaspora and is dubbed the Truong Le Nghia. Fun fact: there was a stone stele called “Duong Thuong Rules” which stated the 10 principles for the Chinese immigrants to do business in Hoi An.

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Phuoc Kien Assembly Hall/Fujian Assembly Hall

Hoi An, Vietnam

I’ve already said that the Duong Thuong Assembly Hall is the oldest temple in Hoi An, however some argue that the Phuoc Kien Assembly Hall was actually built in 1690 and is the oldest. Regardless, the large temple is not to be missed when visiting the Ancient Town of Hoi An. Also known as the Fujian Assembly for having been built to serve the Fujian Chinese community, it was sold to traders from Phuoc Kien after some damage from earthquakes and was restored around 1759.  The architecture of this temple is tremendous and its images and sculptures are some of the finest in the city.

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Quon Cong Temple

Hoi An, Vietnam

The Quon Cong Temple is another example of Chinese craftsmanship and architecture in the Hoi An Ancient Town. Named after a successful Chinese general and sometimes referred to as the Ong Pagoda, it has been reconstructed several times and also features major sculputres, perfectly-manicured bushes and trees, and several prominent Buddha Images.

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Tu Do Tham Quan

Hoi An, Vietnam
The entrance to the Tu Do Tham Quan from Tran Phu Road

Hoi An, Vietnam

The Tu Do Tham Quan is yet another example of brilliant architecture in Hoi An. The humble entranceway gives way to a quiet and peaceful courtyard with perfectly-manicured trees, clean paths and floors, and well-cared for statues and sculptures.

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I hope you all enjoyed the photo drop and breakdown of some of my favorite Hoi An Temples! Don’t forget to follow the links below to read more about the stunning Hoi An Ancient Town and the rest of my travels in Vietnam!

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Hoi An, Vietnam

Hot Shots from Ho Chi Minh – Part Two

Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City is Vietnam’s largest city and has huge buildings, awesome nightclubs and a vibrant culture.

Southeast Asia feels like a totally different world for western travelers, however Ho Chi Minh City is undergoing a renaissance complete with an influx of professionals from the west. Here are a couple of my favorite little spots around the city.

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Ho Chi Minh City
The architectural masterpiece that is the Bitexco Buildling

Ho Chi Minh City is the “city” symbol of Vietnam’s rising economy and new-found wealth. Vietnam’s largest city, formerly-known and sometimes still referred-to as Saigon, has huge skyscrapers and a bustling new industries. Perhaps chief among Ho Chi Minh City’s skyscrapers is the 68-story Bitexco Financial Tower. The 262.5-meters tall building was once the tallest building in all of Vietnam upon its completion in 2010 until 2011. Designed by Venezuelan Carlos Zapata, the renowned design of the Bitexco Financial Tower shows a significant shift in the mentality of the communist-meets-capitalist new reality of the country with a well-known troubled past.

Ho Chi Minh City
Go to the Bitexco Skydeck. You won’t be disappointed.

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As much as the Bitexco Tower is a symbol of Vietnam’s future, the Independance Palace of Ho Chi Minh City is a testament to the country’s past. The deep division sowed into the society between the Democratic and Communist factions before the Vietnam War (or War of American Aggression, depending on who you ask!) has repaired itself as best as probably possible… and of course no one would discount all the things that happened during the build-up, during and of course after the War, by both sides, and the scars the beautiful country still bears to this day.  Not to go too deep into the history of the conflict here (though I may go in-depth on this topic in the future) but for an insight into the war from a Viet Cong leadership perspective the Independence Palace is the place to go.

Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập

Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập Independence Palace - Dinh Độc Lập

Another interesting piece of Vietnamese history is the famous Saigon Central Post Office. Located just caddy corner from the Saigon Notre Dame Basilica in central Ho Chi Minh City, the Post Office itself is still function today and was built during the French Indochina days in the late 19th century. Designed by Alfred Foulhoux with Gothic, Renaissance and French cues, it was finished in 1891.

Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City
“Lignes telegraphiques du Sud Vietnam et Cambodge 1892” – “Telegraphic lines of Southern Vietnam and Cambodia 1892”

All around Ho Chi Minh City are architectural and historical landmarks, such as the Cac Gio Le Catholic Church. Built in 1859, it is located just minutes walking from the Bui Vien backpackers’ area and worth a quick stroll on foot.

Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City

I’ll wrap up this post with a quick word on Ho Chi Minh City nightlife. Basically, whatever you’re looking for is available in the city but one thing is for sure – you don’t have to bend rules to have a great time. Some of my colleagues took me to Glow Skybar and the view alone from the roof was worth it. Drinks can be a bit pricy at some of the trendier nightclubs however a simple search of “bars” on Google Maps will provide you with dozens of options all withing a few block radius. After months in Myanmar, a proper night out can be found in Ho Chi Minh City.

Ho Chi Minh City

Ho Chi Minh City
As blurry as my eyesight!
Ho Chi Minh City
At. Your. Own. Risk.

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I hope you guys enjoyed the post and I’ll be back soon with some more from awesome Vietnam!