Ngahtatgyi Pagoda, Yangon, Myanmar

NGAHTATGYI PAGODA

A rare armor-plated Buddha? Must be the Ngahtatgyi Pagoda in Yangon

To read about my visit to Ngahtatgyi Pagoda, visit the blog here: The Dark and Desolate Nga Htat Gyi For all my High-Resolution images of the Ngahtatgyi Pagoda: Click Here Entrance Fee: Free for foreigners and locals although a $2 USD donation is requested Visiting Hours: The pagoda opens daily from around 6:00am until around 7:00pm Location: The pagoda is located on Shwegondaing Road in Bahan Township of Yangon. It is just across the street from the Chaukhtatgyi “Reclining Buddha” Pagoda and down the road from Parami Pizza II and The Lab tapas and drinks bar

Ngahtatgyi Pagoda

Located across the street from the enormous Reclining Buddha Image of Chaukhtatgyi Pagoda, the Nga Htat Gyi (or Ngahtatgyi, Ngar Htat Gyi, Ngarhtatgyi Pyay) is a Buddhist temple in Yangon, Myanmar. The pagoda is set back far from Shwegondaing Road and behind the Ashay Tawya Monastery, so you’ll need to walk a long path of stairs which are guarded by two very large Chinthes (Burmese mythical lions, read more) not to mention stray dogs! Just before you enter the main temple area with the huge, iconic Buddha image, each side of the entrance is lined with paintings of Buddhist Hell where sinners are said to receive punishment. Built underneath an iron structure with a five-tiered CGI roof (Ngahtatgyi translates roughly to “Five-Layered Roof”), the Buddha image stands about 15 meters tall (46 feet) and has unique Magite armor surrounding its body. The great image sits in the Bhumisparsha Mudra position (Calling the Earth to Witness) and was originally arrayed in monastic robes and now dons the regalia of kings such as a diadem, ear ornaments and jeweled sashes donated by devotees.

Ngahtatgyi Pagoda

Ngahtatgyi Pagoda

Built around the year 1900 and painted in an incredibly gaudy and brilliant gold, the Buddha stands in contrast to its rich carved-wood background. An original 20.5-foot tall Buddha image stood previously at the site and was donated by the seventh king of Toungoo Dynasty of Burma, Minyedeippa back in 1558. One of the pavilion’s walls contains a painting of the Buddha with a long line of followers dressed in red robes. At the right end of the picture a number of statues of disciples seem to emerge from the painting. A large bell hanging down from the pavilion’s ceiling is held by a Naga snake, a mythological animal (read more) believed to protect Buddhism. Other structures on the grounds include several smaller pagodas and the kuti, the monks’ living quarters. Ngahtatgyi Pagoda Ngahtatgyi Pagoda Dimensions: (a) Circumference at the hair knot – 19.5 feet (5.9m) (b) Circumference of the frontlet – 20 feet (6.08m) (c) Distance between the corners of each eye over – 3 feet (1m) (d) Pinna of the ear – 6 feet (1.82m) (e) Length of the nose – 3 feet 6 inches (1.06m) (f) Circumference of the throat – 20 feet (6.08m) (g) Breadth of the shoulders – 24 feet (7.3m) (h) Girth of the arms – 15feet 9 inches (4.79m) (i) Width between the extremities of the knees – 36 feet (10.9m) (j) Length of each palm – 10 feet (3.04m) (k) Length of each thumb – 4.5 feet (1.37m) (1) Length at the soles of feet – 10.5 feet (3.19m) To read about my visit to Ngahtatgyi Pagoda, visit the blog here: The Dark and Desolate Nga Htat Gyi For all my High-Resolution images of the Ngahtatgyi Pagoda: Click Here IMG_3647 Resources: Ngahtatgyi Wiki Myanmars.net Renown Travel

Phillip Harbor

Author, blogger, photographer, all-around world traveler

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Israeli Abroad

IsraeliAbroad (formerly SidepieceDiplomat) was started as a passion project by amateur photographer Phillip Harbor as he travels from Tel Aviv, Israel, to Yangon, Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) and throughout the world. Named for the adventure, the photoblog seeks to give followers a unique insight into life from a nation that was until recently closed off from the rest of the world for more than half a century. This blog is half photo-half information-half experience-driven. Yes that’s more than a whole… and yes that makes about as much sense as anything else you can find on this half of the globe! Feel free to follow us on social media and right here on the blog as we explore the incredible wonders of Myanmar. Updates will come as regularly as possible and don’t forget to share with your friends!

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IsraeliAbroad was started as a passion project by photographer Phillip Harbor as he travels from Tel Aviv, Israel, to Yangon, Myanmar (formerly known as Burma) and throughout the world. Named for the adventure, the photoblog seeks to give followers a unique insight into life from a nation that was until recently closed off from the rest of the world for more than half a century. This blog is half photo-half information-half experience-driven. Yes that’s more than a whole… and yes that makes about as much sense as anything else you can find on this half of the globe! Feel free to follow us on social media and right here on the blog as we explore the incredible wonders of Myanmar. Updates will come as regularly as possible and don’t forget to share with your friends!